Classic Bing Restorations

    Classic Bing Surfboard Restorations. Currently there are three nice Bing restorations on this page. Take the time to let the page load. You will be impressed!

    There are those of us in this world that love our Classic Bing’s so much that we will spend countless hours restoring them back to what they looked like when they came off the rack in Bing’s shop.

     

    Here is the restoration process of Bing #70. Done by our very own Bing historian Tom Moss!

     

    There are those of us in this world that love our Classic Bing's so much that we will spend countless hours restoring them back to what they looked like when they came off the rack in Bing's shop.   Not quite Mena Suvari in a bed of roses... but it's a beauty, again!

    Finished board.  Still a classic pig.

    Not quite Mena Suvari in a bed of roses… but it’s a beauty, again!

    Finished board.  Still a classic pig.

    Finished board. Still a classic pig.

    The glass was specially treated on the fin to show the weave, giving it that early 60s look, and to help hide some of the repaired damage underneath.

    The glass was specially treated on the fin to show the weave, giving it that early 60s look, and to help hide some of the repaired damage underneath.

    Original condition, with a dark suntan, lots of fiberglass delamination and nose and tail dings.

    Original condition, with a dark suntan, lots of fiberglass delamination and nose and tail dings.

    After stripping the glass off, the surface of the foam was very brown, exfoliating (peeling) and bubbled. The blank was sanded down to good foam and all the bubbles cleaned out.

    After stripping the glass off, the surface of the foam was very brown, exfoliating (peeling) and bubbled. The blank was sanded down to good foam and all the bubbles cleaned out.

    The stringer had separated from the foam and was broken in five places and punky (rotten) in the nose and tail.

    The stringer had separated from the foam and was broken in five places and punky (rotten) in the nose and tail.

    Glued and taped (I used too much glue - I didn't realize it was going to expand).

    Glued and taped (I used too much glue – I didn’t realize it was going to expand).

    What do you use to fill hundreds of craters in a surfboard blank? Remember it needs to be lightweight and sand as easily as the surrounding foam. I used lightweight spackle (several quarts!). Not recommended, but as long as the board stays out of the sun in the future, it should be ok... maybe.

    What do you use to fill hundreds of craters in a surfboard blank? Remember it needs to be lightweight and sand as easily as the surrounding foam. I used lightweight spackle (several quarts!). Not recommended, but as long as the board stays out of the sun in the future, it should be ok… maybe.

    The stringer has been reglued and the foam has been filled and reshaped. All the repairs have been color-matched and textured.

    The stringer has been reglued and the foam has been filled and reshaped. All the repairs have been color-matched and textured.

    Ready to glass.

    Ready to glass.

    First layer of 10 ounce glass, trimmed and ready for resin.

    First layer of 10 ounce glass, trimmed and ready for resin.

    One quart of laminating resin per layer of fiberglass.

    One quart of laminating resin per layer of fiberglass.

    The reproduced lam (with original number) is set in resin, before pulling second layer of fiberglass over the board.

    The reproduced lam (with original number) is set in resin, before pulling second layer of fiberglass over the board.

    Sanding the hot coat. The resin/fiberglass dust is really hell on my eyeball pterigiums, even with all the gear on. I bet Bing never had to sand a new board as much as I have sanded this one. At this rate, I'd be lucky to make one board a week working full-time at it.

    Sanding the hot coat. The resin/fiberglass dust is really hell on my eyeball pterigiums, even with all the gear on. I bet Bing never had to sand a new board as much as I have sanded this one. At this rate, I’d be lucky to make one board a week working full-time at it.

    I ran the tape out the length of the board and then dropped it down to pencil marks that I had made on the ends of the board, a half inch outside of the stringer. This is how I was told that the pros typically get a straight line along their panels. After taping off the stringer, I poured on my colored resin mix, spreading it evenly over the board. After the resin began to kick, I pulled the tape off, which revealed a big problem, as you can see in this picture - the clear space along both sides of the stringer was uneven… this was because the board’s stringer varies in width and is bowed, a lot (Thanks, Bing!).

    I ran the tape out the length of the board and then dropped it down to pencil marks that I had made on the ends of the board, a half inch outside of the stringer. This is how I was told that the pros typically get a straight line along their panels. After taping off the stringer, I poured on my colored resin mix, spreading it evenly over the board. After the resin began to kick, I pulled the tape off, which revealed a big problem, as you can see in this picture – the clear space along both sides of the stringer was uneven… this was because the board’s stringer varies in width and is bowed, a lot (Thanks, Bing!).

    – I decided that an unstraight line would not be as noticeable as the uneven space I presently had on the board. So, after sanding the color off, I measured and drew a line a half inch out from the stringer on both sides and then ran the tape along it. On the positive side, this mistake allowed me to have a second attempt at matching the color, which looked too red compared to the original carrot-juice color of the board.

    – I decided that an unstraight line would not be as noticeable as the uneven space I presently had on the board. So, after sanding the color off, I measured and drew a line a half inch out from the stringer on both sides and then ran the tape along it. On the positive side, this mistake allowed me to have a second attempt at matching the color, which looked too red compared to the original carrot-juice color of the board.

    – I added some more resin and mixed in various colors of pigment, finally getting the color to match the piece of colored fiberglass that I had kept from the original board. Blue pigment was the key to toning down the International Orange pigment. (For some reason, the camera does not pick up the orange hue very well.)

    – I added some more resin and mixed in various colors of pigment, finally getting the color to match the piece of colored fiberglass that I had kept from the original board. Blue pigment was the key to toning down the International Orange pigment. (For some reason, the camera does not pick up the orange hue very well.)

    After pulling the tape, you can see that the space between the color and the stringer is very clean and even looking – can’t even tell that it is zig-zagging with the stringer

    Next lesson…With both sides color coated, it was time to lightly sand it, as preparation for the resin gloss coat. This is also the last chance to flatten out any remaining bumps and dips in the surface (the color coat is like an extra sanding coat, you know, at least that’s the way I was thinking). After sanding it pretty good, I noticed there was still one minor dip that bothered me, and I thought I’d hit it one more time. Woops! (not even close to what I said) – foam underneath suddenly became visible. Cringe. Of course, I didn’t have any colored resin mix left to try and patch it with. So, after thinking about it for a day, I started the entire process over – sand the color down on both sides of the board, remix resin and pigments, retape, clean off every speck of dust, pour and brush the color coat on, wait til its tacky, and pull the tape. One thing about surfboard repairs, you can always redo and correct, or hide, your mistakes, if you have enough patience or nothing better to do.

    Next lesson… with both sides color coated, it was time to lightly sand it, as preparation for the resin gloss coat. This is also the last chance to flatten out any remaining bumps and dips in the surface (the color coat is like an extra sanding coat, you know, at least that’s the way I was thinking). After sanding it pretty good, I noticed there was still one minor dip that bothered me, and I thought I’d hit it one more time. Woops! (not even close to what I said) – foam underneath suddenly became visible. Cringe. Of course, I didn’t have any colored resin mix left to try and patch it with. So, after thinking about it for a day, I started the entire process over – sand the color down on both sides of the board, remix resin and pigments, retape, clean off every speck of dust, pour and brush the color coat on, wait til its tacky, and pull the tape. One thing about surfboard repairs, you can always redo and correct, or hide, your mistakes, if you have enough patience or nothing better to do.

    Filing the seam where the gloss coats on the deck and bottom overlap.

    Filing the seam where the gloss coats on the deck and bottom overlap.

    Wet sanding the gloss coat. Dr. Ding said that if I applied the gloss coat correctly, I might only need to hit it with the fine 400 and 600 grit paper... Yaeh right! I started with the much coarser 150 (because I had created more bumps and dips with the finishing resin) and then progressed to 220, then 320, 400 and finally 600.

    Wet sanding the gloss coat. Dr. Ding said that if I applied the gloss coat correctly, I might only need to hit it with the fine 400 and 600 grit paper… Yaeh right! I started with the much coarser 150 (because I had created more bumps and dips with the finishing resin) and then progressed to 220, then 320, 400 and finally 600.

    Ready to be buffed. Tomorrow. I'm ready for a beer.

    Ready to be buffed. Tomorrow. I’m ready for a beer.

    Keep checking back often for the continuation of this restoration project.

    The restoration of Bing #4211 made for Bing Team Member Dean Dietzman in 1965. Restoration by Dr. Ding and board owner Tom Moss.

    This series of photo's you see here is what it took to bring this classic Bing back to life. Our good friends Tom Moss and Mike Janich aka "Dr. Ding" took the time to document how a surfboard should be restored. Tom is an avid Bing collector that wanted to learn the proper way to do it and Dr. Ding is one of the choosen few that have the knowledge to do it. From start to finish took over two months and countless hours! If you ask me it looks like it was worth it....

    This series of photo’s you see here is what it took to bring this classic Bing back to life. Our good friends Tom Moss and Mike Janich aka “Dr. Ding” took the time to document how a surfboard should be restored. Tom is an avid Bing collector that wanted to learn the proper way to do it and Dr. Ding is one of the choosen few that have the knowledge to do it. From start to finish took over two months and countless hours! If you ask me it looks like it was worth it….

    Here is another great series of photo’s of a Bing that had been well used!

     

     This is a very nice restoration of Bing #445 done by Dave Platt of Killcare Beach in the state of New South Wales on the east coast of Australia. Killcare Beach is 100 miles north of Sydney!

    The owner of this board wanted to get back into surfing. He is the second owner. A mate of his purchased it while on a trip to the US. It was in pretty poor condition.

    The stringer is 2″ balsa or I should say was balsa. It was completely rotted and had to be replaced. It has a timber fin with inlays. This was also restored.

    The board was sanded to expose all the dings and old repairs. The remains of the balsa stringer were removed. This meant cutting down each side of the stringer with a diamond saw and scraping the rotted timber out. The foam is in excellent condition. Probably protected by the glue used to glue up the stringer.

    The dings were reglassed and sanded. All the low spots and rails have been faired with a 75% Q-cell 25% aerosil mix. Two layers of 6oz laminated over. The stringer has been rebuilt. End grain balsa was used. Blocks were laminated together and milled into 10mm thick planks. These were glued together two at a time in the board to fit the rocker. Once the stringer was fully glued together it was removed, the edges cleaned up and glued into the board. Two layers of 8oz-boat cloth were laminated over the stringer with Vinylester resin.

    The original timber fin has been rebuilt and reset. All the old glass was removed. The timber was carefully sanded to remove all the excess glass and resin and to expose the inlay work The trailing edge had to be replaced. Western Red Cedar was used. Two sealing coats of resin were applied. Then two layers of 8oz laminated to one side with 10mm of cloth overhanging. This side was hotcoated. The overhang was used to mould the continuous rovings used to form the clear bead around the fin. Once cured the bead was sanded and two layers of 8oz were applied to the fin. Hotcoated and sanded ready for setting onto the board. Once the fin was set the board was hotcoated and sanded ready for the pigment work.

    The stringer and rails were masked and the pigment coats brushed on. I use a mixture of surfboard lam resin and neutral spray gelcoat. 75% resin 25% gelcoat and 3% surfacing agent. The gelcoat is designed to cling to vertical surfaces. This helps on the rails to minimise sagging and separation. The gelcoat ups the geltime slightly without having to use higher catalyst percentages. The board was sanded ready for glossing. Pinlines were masked and brushed on using the same resin/gelcoat mix. The pinlines were lightly sanded and the board was glossed.

    The gloss coats were wet and dry sanded with 600, 1200 and 1500 and the machine polished.

    This custom Bing was ordered September 26, 1961

    This custom Bing was ordered September 26, 1961

    Bing #455 as found.

    Bing #455 as found.

    Looks like a candidate for the burn pile!

    Looks like a candidate for the burn pile!

    What a mess!

    What a mess!

    Deck has been sanded.

    Deck has been sanded.

    .

    .Pigmented bottom.

    Pigmented bottom.

    Pigmented deck, ready for pinlines.

    Pigmented deck, ready for pinlines.

    Glossed deck

    Glossed deck

    Back to showroom condition!

    Back to showroom condition!

    The original fin, back in it's original condition. Nice work Dave!

    The original fin, back in it’s original condition. Nice work Dave!

    Clean Web Design